256-11 Effect of Seed-Placed Sulfate and Phosphate On the Emergence of Brassicae Crops.

Poster Number 142

See more from this Division: S04 Soil Fertility & Plant Nutrition
See more from this Session: General Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition: II
Tuesday, October 18, 2011
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Hall C
Share |

Cory Fatteicher1, Ron Urton1, Peiyuan Qian1, Thomas King1, Jeffrey Schoenau1 and Cynthia Grant2, (1)University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, CANADA
(2)Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Brandon, MB, CANADA

Excess application of fertilizer in the seed-row can lead to seedling damage depending on the fertilizer source and type. Tolerance of Brassicae oilseed crops like canola to seed-row application of nutrients is generally low when compared to many other crops. However, there is little information on their relative tolerance to combinations of seed-row placed sulfur and phosphorus fertilizer. The objectives of this research were to determine the effects of seed-placed ammonium sulfate (AS) and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) fertilizer applied at different rates on seedling emergence of different Brassicae oilseed crops/cultivars under controlled-environmental conditions. Tray experiments were conducted using six treatments consisting of an unfertilized control and five rates of seed-placed S applied as AS in combination with three rates of seed-placed P205 applied as MAP. Seeds were sown into plastic trays at a depth of 1.25cm with 6 rows per tray, creating a seed bed utilization of approximately 15 %. Emergence counts were taken over a two week period. Rates of seed-row placed AS above 2030 kg S haˉ were associated with significant reductions in emergence of most Brassica species/cultivars. Addition of 15 to 30 kg haˉ of seed-placed P205 along with the AS further reduced emergence by about 10 to 15%. Brassica rapa and Brassica juncea were generally more sensitive to injury from seed-row placed S and P than B. napus cultivars. Differences in sensitivity were also observed among cultivars of a species.

See more from this Division: S04 Soil Fertility & Plant Nutrition
See more from this Session: General Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition: II