86-1 Integration of LID Techniques On Military Installations Demonstration Bioswale At Fort Hood.

Poster Number 928

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Land Management & Conservation
See more from this Session: General Military Land Use and Management: II
Monday, October 17, 2011
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Hall C
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Anne P. Dain-Owens1, Heidi Howard2, Niels Svendsen1, Daniel Koch1 and Jennifer Rawlings3, (1)ERDC-CERL, Champaign, IL
(2)U.S. Army, Champaign, IL
(3)Directorate of Public Works - Environmental - Fort Hood, Fort Hood, Fort Hood, TX
Current federal regulations now require Military Installations to adhere to regulation and policy for the implementation of sustainable landscapes, in particular pertaining to storm water management.  Legislative measures in effect include AR 200-1, AR 210-20, Department of the Navy “LID policy,” the Clean Water Act of 1972 as amended in 1987, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 section 438, EO 13148, and EO 13423.  A key component of Federal Agency strategies for legislation compliance is through the inclusion of LID guidelines and principles. 

Due to the nature of military activities, scale of operations, and overall footprint, installations encounter many unique challenges related to storm water management.  Storm water management within any installation is difficult to manage, as the footprint of impervious surfaces is constantly under modification.  With the constant changes in land utilization come associated altered hydrology.  Conventional methods offer little beyond temporary containment or off-site channeling of storm water.  They can also be costly to maintain and in the event of unanticipated high-intensity storm events, carry flood potential from basin overflow.  For successful LID implementation, Installation land and service managers should be informed and have a way of gaining experience installing and maintaining LID technologies.   One approach to provide LID experience is by installing a demonstration LID technology on an Installation.

This presentation showcases an example of a research LID project introducing bioswales as a sustainable alternative to conventional retention basins at Fort Hood, TX.  This demonstration will allow evaluation of LID technology, showing process and approach for a successful LID technology on-Installation.  Once installed, the “Demonstration Bioswale” will be a valuable resource for Installations, and a lessons-learned report will provide a venue for transfer of knowledge including work conducted, materials used, quantities, and evaluations of implementation process costs and environmental and societal benefits.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Land Management & Conservation
See more from this Session: General Military Land Use and Management: II
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