81-3 A Survey of Seed Source and Virus Prevalence In Small-Scale Alaska Potato Production.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Global Agronomy
See more from this Session: Challenges and Opportunities In Sustainable Agriculture: Global Case Studies of Potato Production
Monday, October 17, 2011: 1:30 PM
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Room 006D
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Jodie Anderson1, P. Jeffrey Smeenk1, Carol Lewis2 and Alberto Pantoja3, (1)University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Palmer, AK
(2)University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK
(3)USDA-ARS, Fairbanks, AK
Commercial potato production is the largest valued crop in Alaska and many gardeners also grow this productive, easy to store tuber. In the contiguous United States, viruses and their vectors are considered the most severe limiting factor for seed potato production. Because of geographical isolation and climate, Alaska crops are relatively free of many insect pests and diseases. Reviewed publications documenting plant diseases in Alaska are limited and no epidemiological studies exist for viruses in Alaska potato plants. With the decline in the seed potato industry in the contiguous United States caused by increasing diseases and pests, Alaska is becoming a potential supplier of seed potatoes; therefore, there is a need for increased research to improve the understanding of disease etiologies and disease vectors in non-certified potato growers’ gardens and fields. The School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (SNRAS UAF) and the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA ARS) were interested in determining the viruses present in seed produced outside the Alaska Department of Agriculture’s Potato Seed Certification program including the non-commercial producers that sell or distribute potatoes and the historic potato producers that maintain their own seed stocks and would act as a continuing reservoir and potential source of virus infection. Developing management strategies to minimize viruses may enhance Alaska’s ability to market high quality seed potatoes to other states and countries. This project combined participant surveys, collaborative statewide replicated research projects, winter grow-outs, and potato tissue analysis for virus presence. Project funded through a collaborative agreement between USDA ARS and SNRAS UAF in SCA Number 58-5341-4-590 / G00002016.
See more from this Division: ASA Section: Global Agronomy
See more from this Session: Challenges and Opportunities In Sustainable Agriculture: Global Case Studies of Potato Production