120-7 Adsorption of Nitrogen and Phosphorus by Biochars From Different Water Plants In Constructed Wetlands.

Poster Number 313

See more from this Division: S02 Soil Chemistry
See more from this Session: Sorption to Bioavailability: I
Monday, October 17, 2011
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Hall C
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Se-Won Kang1, Ju-Sik Cho1, Dong Cheol Seo1, Byung-Jin Lim2, Jong-Hwan Park3, Kap-Soon Kim3, Jun-Bae Lee3, Jong-Soo Heo4 and Hyunook Kim5, (1)Department of Bio-Environmental Sciences, Sunchon National University, Sunchon, South Korea
(2)2Yeongsan River Environmental Research Center, National Institute of Environmental Research Ministry of Environment, Gwangju, South Korea
(3)Yeongsan River Environmental Research Center, National Institute of Environmental Research Ministry of Environment, Gwangju, South Korea
(4)Division of Applied Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea
(5)Division of Environmental Engineering, University of Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
Biochar have effects of adsorption on heavy metals and harmful organic material. We compared the adsorption of nitrogen and phosphorus by 5 different biochars produced from different water plants, Carex dimorpholepis Steud, Miscanthus sacchariflorus Benth, Phragmites communis, Typha orientalis and Zizania latifolia, compared to commercially activated carbon as a control. The adsorption capacities of biochars produced from different water plants were quantified. The adsorption characteristics of ammonium nitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and phosphorus by biochars were measured at 20C. The results of this investigation were evaluated using the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of the ammonium nitrogen (determined by Langmuir isotherms) on the various biochars were in the order of Miscanthus sacchariflorus Benth > Phragmites communis > Carex dimorpholepis Steud > Typha orientalis > Zizania latifolia for all biochars tested. The maximum adsorption capacity of the phosphorus on the various biochars at different materials were in the order of Phragmites communis > Miscanthus sacchariflorus Benth > Typha orientalis > Carex dimorpholepis Steud > Zizania latifolia for all biochars tested.
See more from this Division: S02 Soil Chemistry
See more from this Session: Sorption to Bioavailability: I