104-11 Portable Roadway Systems Evaluated Using Simulated Traffic On Playing Surfaces for Non-Sporting Events.

Poster Number 1211

See more from this Division: C05 Turfgrass Science
See more from this Session: Student Poster Competition: Environment & Thatch-Soil, Water, and Pest Management
Monday, October 17, 2011
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Hall C
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Brian J. Tencza and Jason J. Henderson, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Portable Roadway systems evaluated using simulated traffic on playing surfaces for non-sporting events

Brian J. Tencza, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT and Jason J. Henderson, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Many current sports venues routinely host non-sporting events that require vehicular traffic over playing surfaces to set up stages, seating and other event specific equipment. This presents a tremendous challenge to athletic field managers to protect the integrity of the playing surface often times during the season of play. The objectives of this research were to: 1) determine the impact of each cover system on turfgrass color and percent cover when used for multiple cover periods, 2) document changes in playing surface characteristics (surface hardness, traction, and displacement) following each cover period, and 3) evaluate the effects of roadway systems on soil physical properties. This experiment was arranged in a 6 x 3 (cover type x cover period) factorial in a strip plot design with three replications on a mixed stand of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). The main plots (cover period) were split by cover type. The five turf protection systems evaluated were 1) Plywood only (2 layers), 2) Enkamat Plus (1 layer) and Plywood (2 layers), 3) Enkamat Flatback (1 layer) and Plywood (2 layers), 4) Supa-TracTM (Rola-Trak North America), 5) TerraTrak PlusTM (Terraplas USA, Inc.), and 6) and an uncovered treatment. The second factor, cover period, had three levels: 3, 6, and 9 days. An uncovered/untrafficked control was also included. Treatments were subjected to two traffic events; each consisted of 10 passes with a loaded dump truck (gross vehicle weight of rating of 9,072 kg. There were no differences between cover types for turfgrass color and percent cover when the covers were utilized for a three day period. As the cover duration increased, TerraTrak and Supa-Trac retained better color and cover than most of the treatments. No considerable differences in surface hardness or traction existed between cover types and cover periods. The plywood treatments provided the best protection against displacement given the load range tested. All the plywood treatments and the uncovered/untrafficked control had lower bulk density values compared to Supa-Trac, TerraTrak Plus, and the uncovered/trafficked treatment following traffic. The uncovered/untrafficked control had the greatest hydraulic conductivity compared to all other treatments, while the plywood only treatment had greater hydraulic conductivity than Supa-Trac, TerraTrak Plus, and the uncovered/trafficked treatment.

See more from this Division: C05 Turfgrass Science
See more from this Session: Student Poster Competition: Environment & Thatch-Soil, Water, and Pest Management