349-9 Engaging Stakeholders in Research for Managing Climate Risks Lessons From the Southeast Climate Consortium.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Climatology & Modeling
See more from this Session: Symposium--Soil-Plant-Water Relations: Challenges in Model Selection, Parameterization and Validation
Wednesday, October 24, 2012: 3:15 PM
Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 212, Level 2
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Keith T. Ingram1, Wendy-Lin Bartels2, Norman E. Breuer3, James W. Jones1, James O'Brien4 and Clyde W. Fraisse5, (1)Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
(2)University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
(3)University of Miami, Gainesville, FL
(4)Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies - The Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
(5)Agricultural & Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Climate risks pose wicked problems, which are problems that do not have a set solution. Instead, both greater understanding of the wicked problem and partial solutions to the problem evolve iteratively. As such, the research paradigm for climate risk management demands that farmers and extension agents become collaborators with scientists. Opportunities to engage farmers and extension agents in the process of developing decision support systems and other information products include surveys, interviews, workshops, focus groups, working groups, presentations and displays at association meetings, and on-line feedback. As the Southeast Climate Consortium (SECC) developed AgroClimate, an on-line decision support system for extension agents and end-users, we used all of these methods.  Moreover, we recommend that a science-based learning community use as many methods as possible for engagement and collaboration. The most important keys are: 1) knowing which questions to ask; and 2) listening to the answers. By providing a range of engagement methods, individuals can self select how they will engage in the community, which would depend on their level of interest, availability of time, and willingness to commit to an activity. This ability of community members to select the engagement activities in which they will participate applies to nearly all members of the community, including end-users, extension agents, and researchers. The exception to the self selection clause is a core team of three or more individuals who are fully committed to the community.  In case of the SECC, we strive to have a team that includes at least one social scientist, one climate scientist, and one agricultural scientist. The ability of this committed team to work together will be the most critical factor in the success of the engagement.
See more from this Division: ASA Section: Climatology & Modeling
See more from this Session: Symposium--Soil-Plant-Water Relations: Challenges in Model Selection, Parameterization and Validation