14-1 Effects of Varying Salinity On Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Oiled and Unoiled Coastal Louisiana Salt Marsh Soils.

See more from this Division: Students of Agronomy, Soils and Environmental Sciences (SASES)
See more from this Session: Symposium--National Student Research Symposium Oral Contest: Session 2
Sunday, October 21, 2012: 4:05 PM
Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 208, Level 2
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Aaron M. Marti1, Brian J. Roberts2 and John M. Marton2, (1)University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WI
(2)Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON), Chauvin, LA

We quantified the effects of altering salinity regime (5, 15, 25, 35 ppt) and the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill on greenhouse gas (GHG) (CH4, CO2, N2O) production from laboratory incubated oiled and unoiled salt marsh soils of Terrebonne and Barataria Bays, Louisiana. Terrebonne soils, which exhibited higher percentage organic matter and water content, had greater (p= <0.05) CO2 production (869 30 nmol dry g-1 hr-1) than Barataria soils (707 30 nmol dry g-1 hr-1). CH4 production in Terrebonne soils (5 0.5 nmol dry g-1 hr-1) was also greater (p= <0.05) than Barataria soils (3 0.5 nmol dry g-1 hr-1) which exhibited declines in CH4 production at salinities above 5. As salinity was increased relative to field conditions, we observed increased CO2 production from marsh soils (p= <0.001). No response was observed in N2O production across sites or experimental treatments. No significant differences were observed in GHG production between oiled and unoiled sites. Results indicate that salinity changes and site characteristics may be more influential on marsh GHG production compared to oil exposure; information critical to improving global carbon cycling and climatic variation models.

See more from this Division: Students of Agronomy, Soils and Environmental Sciences (SASES)
See more from this Session: Symposium--National Student Research Symposium Oral Contest: Session 2