193-5 Geospatial Analysis to Assess Capacity for Increased Grain Production in Virginia and the Carolinas.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Climatology & Modeling
See more from this Session: General Airborne and Satellite Remote Sensing: I (includes graduate student competition)
Tuesday, November 5, 2013: 11:20 AM
Marriott Tampa Waterside, Room 10
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Ioannis Kokkinidis and Steven C. Hodges, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
To feed the large numbers of animals grown in Virginia, North and South Carolina, large amounts of feed grains are imported mostly from the Midwest, accruing a significant transportation cost. The grains bring with them large nutrient loads which remain in the form of land applied manure which has led to excess phosphorus in soils. An increase in local grain produced can reduce transportation costs and nutrient imports in the region. Using geospatial tools we identify land suitable for grain production. Combining SSURGO with soil based yield prediction databases we created maps of potential yields for 15 major crops. Combining these with NLCD and the NASS Cropland Data Layer to assess current land being used for grain production, we identified uncropped lands with capacity to produce grains. Using the accumulation of NASS CDL we also identify fields that may increase grain production trough changes in rotations, double cropping and adaptation of best agronomic practices.
See more from this Division: ASA Section: Climatology & Modeling
See more from this Session: General Airborne and Satellite Remote Sensing: I (includes graduate student competition)