187-10 The Genetic, Environmental, and GxE Effects on Oil Quality and Yield In Camelina Sativa (L.) Crantz.

Poster Number 127

See more from this Division: C01 Crop Breeding & Genetics
See more from this Session: Graduate Student Poster Competition
Tuesday, November 2, 2010
Long Beach Convention Center, Exhibit Hall BC, Lower Level
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Jean-Nicolas Enjalbert, Colorado State University, fort collins, CO and Jerry Johnson, Soil and crops sciences, Colorado State University, fort collins, CO
The use of straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a fuel in agricultural engines depends on oil quality as well as oilseed yield. Oil quality is affected by the environment, the oilseed species, and variation within species. Oil type and lipid acid ratio affect the NOx, CO, and particulate matter emissions produced by an engine, as well as potential fuel deposits in the engine and power loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate genetic, environmental and genotype-by-environment interaction effects on camelina oil quality and seed yield. Oil quality traits were evaluated in 14 environments in 2009 and 2010 in Washington, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and Arizona on eight camelina varieties. 2009 yield and oil quality traits showed significant genotype by environment (GE) interaction effects (p<.001), suggesting differential responses of the genotypes in the test environments. The level of linolenic (C18:3) was negatively (p<.001) correlated to the level of linoleic (C18:2) and oleic (C18:1). It was positively (p<.001) correlated to increasing precipitation, latitude and soil nitrogen levels. Oilseed yield was correlated (p<.001) to all fatty acid content levels, and environmental criteria from -0.86 for elevation to 0.51 for linolenic fatty acid. If 2010 results follow 2009 results, this study will show the strong influence of the environment on oil quality suggesting potentially different engine performance and emissions when using fuel from oil originating from different environments.
See more from this Division: C01 Crop Breeding & Genetics
See more from this Session: Graduate Student Poster Competition