63-7 Potential Sources of Resistance to Stripe Rust (Puccinia striiformis fsp. titici ).

Poster Number 106

See more from this Division: C01 Crop Breeding & Genetics
See more from this Session: Breeding for Resistance to Biotic Stress
Monday, November 1, 2010
Long Beach Convention Center, Exhibit Hall BC, Lower Level
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Osman Abdalla1, Kumarse Nazari1, Ram C. Sharma1, Brahim ezzahiri2 and Amor Yahyaoui3, (1)ICARDA - Intl Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Aleppo, SYRIA
(2)Plant Protection, University Hassen II, Rabat, Morocco
(3)ICARDA - Intl Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Aleppo, Syria
In West Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus (CAC), and North African (CWANA) countries, wheat is the main cultivated crop under irrigation, in higher rainfall and moderate rainfall agro-ecological areas. Cultivation of high yielding mega-varieties across many countries is rapidly replacing the traditional lower yielding landraces. In CWANA countries, wheat stripe (yellow) rust is a major diseases in irrigated and in the high rainfall areas. Annual yield losses have been recorded in one or more countries and in certain areas have reached epidemic levels. Since 1970ís yellow rust has become sporadic due the deployment of effective resistance genes or gene combinations. Durable resistance has been linked to a number of genes such Yr18 and some very effective major genes such as Yr 9, Yr27; Yr1 that were associated with good parental lines and hence were extensively used by breeding programs globally. Virulent race on Yr9 resistance gene occurred in East Africa and spread eastward affecting wheat production in Middle East, West and South East Asia. Resistance genes Yr27, Yr18, and other Yr-Genes have effectively reduced the impact of yellow rust for over a decade. Recently, virulence on Yr27 has been detected in many countries. The spread of this new virulence is a typical example of potential risk of wheat rusts. Major genes are implicitly vulnerable to pathogen plasticity, and their longevity can range from rapid vulnerability to relative (and often deceiving) durability. This paper discusses potential resistance sources to wheat stripe rust in new elite bread wheat genotypes.
See more from this Division: C01 Crop Breeding & Genetics
See more from this Session: Breeding for Resistance to Biotic Stress