254-7 New Life for Canola and Other Oilseeds On the Southern Great Plains.

See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Winter
Wednesday, November 3, 2010: 11:45 AM
Long Beach Convention Center, Room 201A, Second Floor
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Dick Auld1, Calvin Trostle2, Joe Oswalt3, Jacob Reiff1, Michael Foster4, Sangamesh Angadi5 and Aaron Benson6, (1)Plant & Soil Science Dept., Texas Tech University & Texas AgriLife Reserch, Lubbock, TX
(2)Soil & Crop Sciences, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX
(3)Plant & Soil Science Dept., Texas Tech Univesity, Lubbock, TX
(4)Texas Agrilife Research, Pecos, TX
(5)New Mexico State University, Clovis, NM
(6)Agricultural & Applied Economic, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX
For the past two decades, researchers at Texas Tech University and Texas A&M University have conducted research focused on developing the cultivars and cultural practices necessary to make Canola and Winter Rapeseed production on the Southern Great Plains a commercial reality.  Successful small plot research and commercial production of this crop has been limited by 1) poor fall stand establishment; 2) dry winters; 3) hail; 4) cabbage aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae L.) infestations; and 5) seed shatter prior to harvest.   The increasing use of subsurface drip irrigation (SSDI) in this region provides an opportunity to improve fall plant establishment and to efficiently apply critical irrigation water needed during dry winter months.  A second oilseed production scheme currently being developed by Texas AgriLife, New Mexico State University, Texas Tech University and USDA-ARS will allow production of very drought tolerant oilseed species such as castor (Ricinus communis L.) or winter safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) in this region with minimal irrigation inputs.  This research thrust includes genetic enhancement of, development of production guidelines, determination of the ecological impact of drought tolerant annual crop production on marginal soils, and life cycle analysis at each step from field to harvest.  This research focuses on use of new oilseed crops as edible oils, industrial oils, and biofuel feedstocks
See more from this Division: U.S. Canola Association Research Conference
See more from this Session: Canola Agronomy Crop Production: Winter