113-3 Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography (XMT) New Means to Quantify Root Induced Changes of Rhizosphere Physical Properties.

See more from this Division: S01 Soil Physics
See more from this Session: Symposium--Tomography and Imaging for Soil-Water-Root Processes: I
Monday, October 22, 2012: 8:45 AM
Duke Energy Convention Center, Room 232, Level 2
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Jazmin Aravena1, Markus Berli2, Manoj Menon3, Teamrat Ghezzehei4, Ajay K. Mandava5, Emma E. Regentova5, Kranthi K. Potteti5, Natarajan S. Pillai5, John Steude2, Michael H. Young6, Scott Tyler7 and Peter S. Nico8, (1)Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV
(2)Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV
(3)Civil and Structural Engineering Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
(4)University of California, Merced, University of California-Merced, Merced, CA
(5)Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV
(6)Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX
(7)University of Nevada - Reno, Reno, NV
(8)Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA
The rhizosphere, a thin layer of soil surrounding plant roots, plays a dynamic role in the hydrologic cycle by governing plant water and nutrient uptake. Study of rhizosphere soil structure formation due to mechanical processes has been limited by a lack of non-destructive techniques to quantify the dynamic nature of this region. In this chapter, we present recent developments in visualizing how growing roots modify their physical environment by moving soil particles, deforming aggregates and decreasing the amount of inter-aggregate pores while creating hydraulic pathways that connect neighboring soil aggregates using non-invasive, synchrotron X-ray Micro-Tomography (XMT). Image processing tools were applied for quantifying root-induced rhizosphere alterations from XMT grayscale images as well as to transform XMT images into Finite Element meshes, building a bridge from non-destructive rhizopshere visualization to micromechanical and hydraulic simulations.
See more from this Division: S01 Soil Physics
See more from this Session: Symposium--Tomography and Imaging for Soil-Water-Root Processes: I