77014 Evaluation of Fertilizer and Bio-Soil Enhancers in Bermudagrass Forage Production.

See more from this Division: Submissions
See more from this Session: Professional Oral Soils & Crops
Tuesday, February 5, 2013: 8:30 AM
Share |

Rocky Lemus1, Joshua White1, Karl Crouse2, Jesse I. Morrison2, Jac J. Varco2 and Michael Cox3, (1)Plant and Soil Science, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
(2)Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
(3)117 Dorman Hall, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
Increase in fertilizer prices has driven hay producers to look for alternative management strategies that reduce fertilizer loses and   efficiency.  Fertilizer and bio-soil enhancer products are enhancements that advertise increased fertilizer efficiency.   Most of these products are new to the market with no scientific data describing how they impact forage production.  Two studies were conducted on a 10-yr old Sumrall 007 bermudagrass stand to determine the efficacy of commercially available products.  Fertilizer enhancers (Agrotain, Nutrisphere, and ESN) were applied along with two N sources (Urea and UAN) at 224, 168 and 112 kg N ha-1 in four split applications.  Bio-soil enhancers (Sumagrow Hydra-Hume and C-Cat) were applied at a rate of 9.4 L ha-1 alone or in combination with two N sources (Urea and UAN) at a rate of 56 kg ha-1.  Treatments in each of the experiments were applied at the beginning of the growing season and after each of the subsequent 3 harvests.  Differences between the treatments (harvest yield and total yield) were caused by the fertilizer source and rate rather than the application of fertilizer enhancers.   Bio-soil enhancers increased total yields from 29 to 94% in 2011 when compared to the control, but were up to 112% lower than urea applications.  Total bio-soil enhancer yields were lower than the control in 2012. Data showed no economic benefit of fertilizer or bio-soil enhancers over standard fertilizer practices.  Beneficial microbes may not be needed in perennial forage systems due to existing native populations and poor nutrient responses might be more related to other nutrient imbalances in the soil.
See more from this Division: Submissions
See more from this Session: Professional Oral Soils & Crops