91007
Row Pattern, Row Spacing, and Seeding Rate Effects on Peanut.

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See more from this Session: Graduate Student Oral Competiton Crops
Monday, February 2, 2015: 9:15 AM
Westin Peachtree Plaza, Chastain F
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Michael Plumblee, University of Georgia - Tifton, West Columbia, SC and R. Scott Tubbs, University of Georgia - Tifton, Tifton, GA
Row pattern, row spacing, and seeding rate can affect crop yield and production economics. In Georgia, common crop rotations include corn (Zea mays L.), peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). Previous research has shown that twin row peanut can produce higher yields than single row spacing, due to reducing Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) (Tospovirus) incidence in non-resistant cultivars. Now that TSWV-resistant cultivars have been developed and are being grown in Georgia, re-evaluation of current row pattern, row spacing, and seeding rate recommendations need to be assessed. By re-evaluating recommendations it may allow for simplification of planting operations from reduced equipment costs. This study was conducted to determine which row pattern, row spacing, and seeding rate can maximize peanut yield. In 2014, trials were investigated in Tifton, GA and Camilla, GA. In this experiment peanut was planted in 76-cm and 91-cm single rows and 91-cm twin rows at targeted plant populations (185,250 plants ha-1, 214,900 plants ha-1, and 244,500 plants ha-1) by manipulating seeding rates. Yield results for peanut in Camilla showed no significant differences among row pattern, row spacing, or seeding rate. Yield results for peanut in Tifton showed no significant differences among seeding rate but did show a significant difference among row spacing. The 76-cm single (9,340 kg ha-1) and 91-cm single (9,050 kg ha-1) rows yielded significantly higher than 91-cm twin (7,930 kg ha-1) row pattern. From the 2014 Tifton results, growing peanut in a single row pattern would result in highest pod yield. However, additional data and research is needed to determine the row pattern, row spacing, and seeding rate combination that will maximize peanut yield in combination with other agronomic variables.
See more from this Division: Submissions
See more from this Session: Graduate Student Oral Competiton Crops