375-2 Global Review of Winter Manure Application Regulations and Guidelines.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Environmental Quality
See more from this Session: Symposium--Minimizing Phosphorus Losses during the Non-Growing Season

Wednesday, November 9, 2016: 8:15 AM
Phoenix Convention Center North, Room 124 A

Jian Liu1, Peter J.A. Kleinman2, Helena Aronsson3, Marianne Bechmann4, Douglas B. Beegle5, Ray B. Bryant2, Don Flaten6, Hongbin Liu7, Richard McDowell8, Timothy P. Robinson9, Andrew N. Sharpley10 and Tamie L. Veith2, (1)Department of Plant Science, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA
(2)Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit, USDA-ARS, University Park, PA
(3)Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden
(4)Div. for Environment and Natural Resources, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research, ├ůs, Norway
(5)Plant Science, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
(6)Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
(7)Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China
(8)AgResearch, Mosgiel, New Zealand
(9)Livestock Systems and Environment Research Theme, International Livestock Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya
(10)115 Plant Sciences Bldg., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
Abstract:
Application of animal manure to frozen and snow-covered soils can increase the risk of nutrient losses and impairment of water quality in regions with hardy winters. In conjunction with global distributions of animal densities, we reviewed world-wide regulatory and voluntary guidelines on winter manure management to reduce off-site nutrient losses. Almost all developed countries have guidelines to restrict winter manure applications either completely (e.g., European Union member nations), or partially (e.g., most states/provinces of United States, Canada, and New Zealand). Approaches range from restricted manure application over large periods of time to guidelines based upon field conditions. In USA, guidelines for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are often stricter than for non-CAFOs. In contrast, there is a paucity of such guidelines in developing countries such as China, despite an increasing animal production industry and concern over water quality. This review explores the causes of variability in guidelines and highlights opportunities to advance existing guidelines.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Environmental Quality
See more from this Session: Symposium--Minimizing Phosphorus Losses during the Non-Growing Season