60-4 Soil Quality Our Hometown, Our Country, Our World We Are All Neighbors.

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Agronomic Production Systems
See more from this Session: Symposium--the Legacy of John Doran: From Soil Quality to Organic Practices
Monday, October 17, 2011: 2:05 PM
Henry Gonzalez Convention Center, Room 213B
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Ann Kennedy, USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA
Soil health, or quality, is broadly defined by John Doran et al. as ‘the capacity of a living soil to function within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries; to sustain plant and animal productivity; maintain or enhance water and air quality; and promote plant and animal health.’  Soil quality and health change over time due to natural events or human impacts.  Sustainable practices will result only when the multiple functions of soil are included in decisions. Soil quality is the major link between the strategies of conservation management practices and achievement of the major goals of sustainable agriculture.  In defining sustainable agricultural management, Doran and friends stress the importance of holistic management approaches that optimize the multiple functions of soil, conserve soil resources, and support strategies for promoting soil quality.  John Doran and colleagues proposed the use of a basic set of indicators to assess soil quality in various agricultural systems.  With the soil quality test kit, Doran placed in the hands of producers worldwide the means to assess their own management practices and their effects on soil health.  Through his energy and his career, John Doran has ‘translated science into practice’ in his neighbors’ fields, the nation’s fields and throughout the world. His efforts have accelerated the development of management systems that are truly sustainable and maintain acceptable levels of productivity, foster reduction in the inputs of non-renewable resources, and minimize impact on the environment.  John Doran is not only an accomplished scientist; he is a great friend and neighbor to all he meets.  He has added much to the lives of many and forwarded the science.  I have observed that he enjoys working with all and he is humble in his interpretation of his impact on our science.  The earth and the world benefit from his legacy.
See more from this Division: ASA Section: Agronomic Production Systems
See more from this Session: Symposium--the Legacy of John Doran: From Soil Quality to Organic Practices