258-7 CO2 Emission from Soil Affected By Crop Rotation Systems Under No-till.

Poster Number 408

See more from this Division: ASA Section: Environmental Quality
See more from this Session: Agriculture and Land Management Impacts on Soil Carbon Processes: II (includes student competition)
Tuesday, November 4, 2014
Long Beach Convention Center, Exhibit Hall ABC
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João Paulo Rigon, São Paulo State University, Botucatu, BRAZIL, Juliano Carlos Calonego, Sao Paulo State University, Botucatu, Brazil, Ciro Antonio Rosolem, Crop Science, Sao Paulo State University, Botucatu, Brazil, Gustavo Castoldi, Crop Science, São Paulo State University, Botucatu, São Paulo, BRAZIL and Silvia Capuani, So Paulo State University, Botucatu, Brazil
Poster Presentation
  • Pster ASA JP.pdf (551.0 kB)
  • The objective of this study was to assess the CO2 soil emissions into the atmosphere throughout a soybean cultivation as affected by different crop rotations under no-till. This experiment has been conducted in Botucatu, SP, Brazil, under no-till and with the same crop rotations since 2003. The experiment was carried out a split plot design in Typic Rhodudalf. The plots constituted by winter crops triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) and sunflower. The subplots and managements spring involving pearl millet, sorghum and sunn hemp, and chiseling/fallow (2003; 2009; 2013). In the summer was cropped with soybean. The CO2 emission from soil, as well as soil moisture and temperature, was measured at 1, 2, 3, 8, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days after soybean sowing (2013/14), using an Automated Flux CO2 Soil System, LI-8100A. Generally speaking, CO2 emissions from soil were lower in the sunn hemp and chiseling/fallow land subplots and in the sunflower plots. The largest CO2 emission peaks were observed at 60 days after soybean sowing. It was found a strong positive correlation between CO2 soil emission and soil temperature and moisture, so those high CO2 emission values occurred much probably due to high temperature and moisture of the soil.
    See more from this Division: ASA Section: Environmental Quality
    See more from this Session: Agriculture and Land Management Impacts on Soil Carbon Processes: II (includes student competition)